Haiku Thursday

My latest murder mystery revolves around haiku, so every week I’m publishing a classic Japanese haiku, illustrated with a woodblock print or painting from the British Museum collection. Today’s poem is by Masaoka Shiki.

A haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. I’ve kept to that in the translations.

It’s snowing outside
I can see it through a hole
In the paper screen

Admiring the Snow © British Museum The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-writing trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Ebook and paperback out now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

The Haiku Murder

Haiku Thursday

My latest murder mystery revolves around haiku, so every week I’m publishing a classic Japanese haiku, illustrated with a woodblock print or painting from the British Museum collection. Today’s poem is by Masaoka Shiki.

A haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. I’ve kept to that in the translations.

An iris flower
A single bloom gleaming white
In the spring twilight

Maruyama Oshin - iris © British Museum

Maruyama Oshin – iris © British Museum

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-writing trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Ebook and paperback out now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

The Haiku Murder

Haiku Thursday

My latest murder mystery revolves around haiku, so every week I’m publishing a classic Japanese haiku, illustrated with a woodblock print or painting from the British Museum collection. Today’s poem is by Masaoka Shiki.

A haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. I’ve kept to that in the translations.

The tree’s been cut down
And now the dawn breaks early
Through my small window

Hokusai, Snowy dawn at Koishikawa © British Museum

Hokusai, Snowy dawn at Koishikawa © British Museum

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-writing trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Ebook and paperback out now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

The Haiku Murder

Haiku Thursday

Every Thursday I publish a classic haiku from one of the Japanese haiku masters. Today’s haiku is by Masaoka Shiki.

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

People are dreadful
They’ll even argue about
The price of orchids

Hiranoya Shinzo - Kabuki Actor Sawamura Tosshi VI likened to a fringed orchid © British Museum

Hiranoya Shinzo – Kabuki Actor Sawamura Tosshi VI likened to a fringed orchid © British Museum

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-writing trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Ebook and paperback out now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

Haiku Thursday

Every Thursday I publish a classic haiku from one of the Japanese haiku masters. Today’s haiku is from Masaoka Shiki.

Oh, that surprised me!
The fall of a moonflower
The sound of midnight

Utagawa Kuniyoshi - Plum Tree at Night © British Museum

Utagawa Kuniyoshi – Plum Tree at Night © British Museum

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-writing trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Ebook and paperback out now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

Haiku Countdown Day Nine

My new Josie Clark in Japan murder mystery, The Haiku Murder, will be published on 13th October, so I’m doing a haiku countdown. I’m posting ten classic haiku, one a day for ten days, featuring haiku by two of the greatest haiku masters, the seventeenth century poet Matsuo Basho and the nineteen century poet Masaoka Shiki.

Today’s haiku is from Shiki.

A temple bell rings
Its circling echo tells of
A long night coming 

Kawabata Gyokusho, The evening bell at Asakusa

Kawabata Gyokusho, The evening bell at Asakusa © British Museum

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-wrting trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Pre-order the ebook now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA. The paperback will be out on 13th October.

Haiku Countdown Day Eight

My new Josie Clark in Japan murder mystery, The Haiku Murder, will be published on 13th October, so I’m doing a haiku countdown. I’m posting ten classic haiku, one a day for ten days, featuring haiku by two of the greatest haiku masters, the seventeenth century poet Matsuo Basho and the nineteen century poet Masaoka Shiki.

Today’s haiku is from Shiki.

In the bright moonlight
Something occurs to me
I’m all alone

Hokusai: Poem by Abe no Nakamaro © British Museum

Hokusai: Poem by Abe no Nakamaro © British Museum

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-wrting trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Pre-order the ebook now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA. The paperback will be out on 13th October.

Haiku Countdown Day Six

My new Josie Clark in Japan murder mystery, The Haiku Murder, will be published on 13th October, so I’m doing a haiku countdown. I’m posting ten classic haiku, one a day for ten days, featuring haiku by two of the greatest haiku masters, the seventeenth century poet Matsuo Basho and the nineteen century poet Masaoka Shiki.

Today’s haiku is from Shiki.

Memories of home
Summer festivals ending
Taste of persimmons

Hoitsu - Crow on a Persimmon Bow © British Museum

Hoitsu – Crow on a Persimmon Bow © British Museum

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-wrting trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Pre-order the ebook now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA. The paperback will be out on 13th October.

Haiku Countdown Day Four

My new Josie Clark in Japan murder mystery, The Haiku Murder, will be published on 13th October, so I’m doing a haiku countdown. I’m posting ten classic haiku, one a day for ten days, featuring haiku by two of the greatest haiku masters, the seventeenth century poet Matsuo Basho and the nineteen century poet Masaoka Shiki.

Today’s haiku is from Shiki.

I’m peeling a pear
The sweet drops are dripping
Along the knife edge

Utamaro - Bijin Juyo © British Museum

Utamaro – Bijin Juyo © British Museum

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-wrting trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Pre-order the ebook now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA. The paperback will be out on 13th October.

Haiku Countdown Day Three

My new Josie Clark in Japan murder mystery, The Haiku Murder, will be published on 13th October, so I’m doing a haiku countdown. I’m posting ten classic haiku, one a day for ten days, featuring haiku by two of the greatest haiku masters, the seventeenth century poet Matsuo Basho and the nineteen century poet Masaoka Shiki.

Today’s haiku is from Shiki.

A chilly morning
In the sky the purple clouds
Are fading away

Hokusai: The bridge of boats at Sano © British Museum

Hokusai: The bridge of boats at Sano © British Museum

Reminder – a haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. In translating these haiku I’ve tried to preserve that structure.

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-wrting trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Pre-order the ebook now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA. The paperback will be out on 13th October.