Haiku Thursday

My latest murder mystery revolves around haiku, so every week I’m publishing a classic Japanese haiku, illustrated with a woodblock print or painting from the British Museum collection. Today’s poem is by haiku master Matsuo Basho.

A haiku is a short poem in three lines of five, seven and five syllables. I’ve kept to that in the translations.

In the end we’ll die
Never see beauty again
So sings the cricket

Shimomura Kanzan, Hanging scroll. Peonies, grasses and cicada. © British Museum

Shimomura Kanzan, Hanging scroll. Peonies, grasses and cicada. © British Museum

The Haiku Murder – Tokyo-based expat Londoner Josie Clark’s haiku-writing trip comes to an abrupt end when a charismatic financier falls from the top of Matsuyama Castle. But was he pushed? Ebook and paperback out now on Amazon UK and Amazon USA.

The Haiku Murder